Continuing our conversation about the Tokyo Art Book Fair

For those of you who read the most recent blog at Tokyo Spidering, here is a continuation of the dialogue about the Tokyo Art Book Fair that has been taking place in the comment sections….

Arthur:

Lori, I was thinking about your comment, “One thing I noticed about the photography was a zine approach and the use of recycled looking paper.” I was looking through the book I bought about making your own zine, 自由に遊ぶDIYづくり this morning and it seems that the method of printing suggested was either color printer or copier which might reflect the DIY zine quality of a lot of works at the Art Book Fair. As you said, paper choice is an important factor in how the images look. It makes me realize how all factors in putting together a book need to be considered. One thing I miss in most of the books that I saw was texture inherent in the book – cover and pages.

What I would like to see is more hand printed books with silkscreen, wood relief, or linocut. I only remember seeing a handful of books with those kind of books. Those type of books take more time and require additional equipment, but I think there is something fantastic about the tactile quality of hand-printed books.

 

Lori:

Agreed. That is really getting old school and really “art” book!

Referencing our earlier discussion of price point, I would pay more money for that kind of book or zine. That much work starts leaving zine territory and becomes more like an artifact. I love that.

 

Arthur:

I would really love to see more of that. Maybe even a photobook that has been handprinted in CMYK!

I been steadily buying pieces of wood and linoleum for carving, but I haven’t gotten around to playing with those. I also bought some keshigomu to make stamps as a way of getting back into printing without committing to a whole piece of wood or linoleum. Sorting out what I want to make in book form has been the sticking point for me. Hopefully after Tokyo Spidering I will have time to explore bookmaking, printing, and bookbinding more thoroughly.

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